design systems design

Dynamic Identities in Cultural and Public Contexts

Dynamic Identities

Talking about books, Dynamic Identities in Cultural and Public Contexts is a book by Ulrike Felsing, published by Lars Müller this year.

The book explores and showcases different approaches to dynamic identities, and simultaneously introduces us to related topics and concepts in a larger context.

One of it’s aims is to show and describe the general principles of variation processes. This is done through 24 case studies, everything from typographic systems like A typeface for the Twin Cities by Letterror, to visual identities for The Cinémathèque française by Ruedi Baur et Associés or Rotterdam 2001 by Armand Mevis and Linda van Deursen. Even many of the examples seems quite old today and the works could have been more varieted from more nations, (the netherlands highly represented), the book in total fulfills it’s aim and deliver an inspiring and promising introduction on the subject of dynamic identities.

This publication studies methods for creating flexible looks for public and cultural institutions. The classic logos normally used by companies are the result of a unique process of compression and abstraction. By contrast, flexible looks do not conceal their diverse components of identity in a logo, forming instead a complex family of symbols from them. In the combination of a basic logo and a family of symbols, the look is in a position to represent the fundamentals (the philosophy of the institution, its program) and the specifics (e.g., temporary exhibitions and events). The author describes the effect and potential of looks and offers the criteria that distinguish fully developed, dynamic looks. Case studies of famous designers such as Karl Gerstner and Ruedi Baur enhance the analysis.

With an essay by Clemens Bellut

16.5 × 24 cm, 6½ x 9½ in, 256 pages, 200 illustrations, softcover (2010)

Images and quote from Lars Müller Publishers where you also can buy it.

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One response

  1. Pingback: Dynamic Identities in Cultural and Public Contexts (via rules based design) « design focus

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